Thursday, September 19, 2013

Reef that Crab



 
Reto Brehm's P5 proa "Lili'Uokalani" with a shunting Oceanic lateen rig. 
 
 

 
There has never been a completely satisfying way to reef a crab claw sail.  If you just furl up some of the area along the boom, you still end up with the sail at full hoist, not the best place for the area when the wind is strong.  Reto rigged a ring or loop of beads that slides down over the halyard to lower the yard and yet keep it tight against the mast.  The control line is led out to the main shroud to give a new support point to the mast and prevent any excessive bending.


 

Monday, September 9, 2013

Ulua in Brazil

 
Remo Eckert from Peruyibe, Brazil has done a superb job on his Ulua project.  The iakos and ama are slightly different from the design plan but are very similar to Hawaiian designs in use today.


A clear finished stripper hull can be stunning, but I've always felt that having some painted sections make the varnished parts stand out even more.  Remo got the balance just right.

Monday, September 2, 2013

Recycled Rigs

One of the best ways to get a high performance rig at minimal cost is to buy an old racing dinghy that may be rotting away but still has several thousand dollars worth of stainless steel hardware, aluminium spars and a set of sails.  I got lucky and found the rig from a NZ/Aus  Javelin racing dinghy for $150.  The Javelin is a 14' development class, designed by John Spencer, that's been around since 1961.  It can do 25 knots with it's big gennaker.  I only got a main and jib, along with a 24' aluminium tapered mast, boom and a big bucket full of hardware.

 
 Racers don't usually have any way to reef, so the first job was to modify the sail for two big slab reefs.  The sail also had a boltrope along the luff that fed into a slot on the mast.  It's much easier to raise and lower the sail if it has slug slides that fit into the slot, so I put in grommets and slides.

 
After hoisting the sail for the first time, I was very pleased with the foil shape.  My sail is a little older than the one in the first photo and has less of a square head than the newer ones.

 
Now I have to see if I can keep it right-side up!